Tuesday, January 18, 2022

HOW TO WRITE GOOD--by Cheryl Pierson

Since I ran out of time to come up with a wonderful new post for today, I thought I would put up something funny--yet meaningful in some ways. (Tongue in cheek.) It's a re-run from a few years back, but might give you a chuckle.

(Number 6 should say, "Writers" not "Writes")

What do you think? Have any others to add? After years of editing, the one that comes to mind for me is, "Be care of using too many descriptive, detailed, pointed, modifying adjectives and adverbs all together, separated by so many commas that your run on sentence can only be halted in mid-stride by a semi-colon; then, it plunges on down the mountain and around the curve toward the oblivion that it was destined for because no one can even remember or, by this point, care about what you were trying to relate in the first place."

Pet peeves anyone? It's your turn to talk about Writing Good!

21 comments:

  1. I found the run on sentence entertaining. Thanks for sharing that one.

    As someone who is always trying to improve, any reminders or new information is like gold to me. Doris

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Doris! I agree--no matter how long we write, reminders are always a good thing. It's hard to remember it ALL! LOL Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  2. I don't need to know how to write good. I need to know how to write gooder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HA! I love your sense of humor! If we didn't have humor in our lives while we tried to write, we'd probably all just go crazy. That's why I love little fun things like this--it keeps us laughing! Glad you stopped by, Jerry!

      Delete
  3. Its just that we all too often overuse just and that. Gordo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now, Gordo, that made me laugh out loud! Love it!

      Delete
  4. Cheryl,

    Humor helps the grammar medicine go down. haha Love this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right, Kaye. A little tongue-in-cheek writing humor is a great way to keep our sanity, right? (Well, most of it anyhow!)

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. Vicky, I thought it was, too, and it gave me a giggle! We can all use a little laugh now and then. Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Delete
  6. Thanks for the reminders and the laughs.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Someone once said, There are three rules to writing, but no one knows what they are." I'm glad you found some for us, Cheryl.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HA! I love that! The three rules that no one knows. That's about the size of it, isn't it? LOL This list of "how to write good" just made me laugh and I thought it might brighten up everyone's day a little. Glad you enjoyed it, Michael!

      Delete
  8. Love this, Cheryl. I appreciate a writer who can write humor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Agnes! Thanks so much for stopping by! I didn't write this myself, just borrowed it, but I do think it's funny and good for a laugh while it also helps us remember "how to write good" along the way, too! LOL

      Delete
  9. Cheryl,

    Over the years you have worked so hard to keep this blog going, to solicit writers to contribute, schedule them, and contribute your own pieces.

    As writers we try very hard to write good stories, ones that are properly edited and free of grammatical errors.

    Yes, and it is great to see your humor on display. We all need to learn "HOW TO WRITE GOOD!"

    Wishing even more success for all fellow WESTERN FICTIONEERS WRITERS.

    Charlie Steel

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aww, Charlie, thanks so much for those very kind words. Livia, Doris, and I all do a lot behind the scenes to keep the blog up and running and try to keep it fresh. I thought this little fun piece of fluff would bring a smile to our little group of writers. Just something funny.

      YES! Much success to all of the WESTERN FICTIONEERS!

      Delete
  10. Reminds me of what Winston Churchill said about ending a sentence with a preposition. "That is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put." Of course, everyone should realize that a so-called preposition without an object is not a preposition. It's an adverb. ROL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, love me some Winston Churchill! LOL My mom, when I was growing up, if I asked "Where are you at?" would say, "Behind the at!" I supposed this was something her own teachers had said to their students. LOL The English language is so fascinating, isn't it? I'm so glad you stopped by!

      Delete